Nuclear Medicine

American College of Radiology – Accredited Facilty – Nuclear MedicineBy using small amounts of radioactive substances, radiologists can observe your internal organs or bones working in real time. Healthcare providers use these tests to diagnose a variety of problems for kidney function, heart circulation, fractured bones, thyroid and cancer.

If there is any possibility that you are pregnant or if you are nursing, please speak with your referring healthcare practitioner before your scheduled appointment.

 

Cardiac Stress Test

A cardiac nuclear stress test is a non-invasive way to diagnose coronary artery disease. It can reveal narrowing or blockage of the blood vessels leading to the heart. You should be prepared to spend 3 to 4 hours at the radiology facility for this test. There are two parts of the test — a rest component performed first, followed by the “stress” portion when you will exercise on a treadmill, if you are capable. You will receive an injection before each segment of the test and it takes 30 to 60 minutes for each injection to distribute throughout the heart. Each of the two scans takes 30 minutes to acquire.

 

Preparing for a Nuclear Stress Test

  • Please do not eat or drink 3 to 4 hours prior to the test. No caffeine is allowed 24 hours prior to your exam. Since even decaffeinated beverages such as decaf coffee and tea carry a small amount of caffeine, they should also be avoided. Water is acceptable.
  • You may be asked to temporarily stop taking certain medications before the test. Please discuss your current medications with your healthcare provider and also let our technologist know when you arrive.
  • Since you will be exercising on a treadmill, it will help to wear comfortable clothing and footwear.

 

Bone Scan

A bone scan is used to diagnose an infection, bone lesions, degenerative bone disorders or fractures. This is a two-part exam. First you will receive an injection and then you will be asked to return 2 to 4 hours after the injection to complete the scan.

 

Preparing for a nuclear bone scan

  • There is no preparation for this exam.
  • If you have outside imaging films or X-Rays, please bring them with you. It is helpful to compare them with your Bone Scan.

 

Thyroid Uptake and Scan

A thyroid uptake and scan evaluates the structure and function of the thyroid gland. It is usually a 2-day procedure. On the first day, you will take a capsule that contains a small amount of radioiodine. The scan itself is performed the next day in most cases, and takes approximately 60 minutes.

 

Preparing for a thyroid uptake and scan

Thyroid medications interfere with the thyroid scan. If you are taking any thyroid medications, it is very important that you discuss it with your healthcare provider before scheduling the test. Depending on the information desired and the type of thyroid medication you are taking, you may have to discontinue the medications for a few days to a few weeks before the test.

 

Gastric Emptying

Gastric emptying study is a procedure that is done to measure the time it takes food to empty from the stomach.

 

Preparing for a Gastric Emptying exam:

  • Please do not eat or drink 4 hours prior to the test. No caffeine is allowed 24 hours prior to your exam. Since even decaffeinated beverages such as decaf coffee and tea carry a small amount of caffeine, they should also be avoided. Water is acceptable.

 

HIDA Scan

A HIDA Scan is gallbladder scan that is done to evaluate gallbladder function.

 

Preparing for a HIDA Scan

  • Please do not eat or drink 4 hours prior to the test. No caffeine is allowed 24 hours prior to your exam. Since even decaffeinated beverages such as decaf coffee and tea carry a small amount of caffeine, they should also be avoided. Water is acceptable.

 

Renal Scan

A renal scan is performed to evaluate the blood flow and function of the kidneys, while looking for blockage, scars and infections. Renal scans can also determine if there is a narrowing in the artery of your kidneys. During the renal scan you will be given a low dose radioactive compound injection that will enter the bloodstream, and is carried to your kidneys.

 

Resources

www.radiologyinfo.com